Arrest made in 1975 homicide in Lancaster County

Lancaster County District Attorney Heather Adams announced Monday an arrest in the county’s oldest cold case, the 1975 Murder of 19-year-old Lindy Sue Biechler. At a Monday morning news conference, Adams said police have arrested David Vincent Sinopoli, 68, of East Hempfield Township. Note: you can watch the full news conference in the video player below.”Lindy Sue Biechler was 19 when her life was brutally taken away from her 46 years ago in the sanctity of her own home. The arrest of David Sinopoli marks the beginning of the court process and we hope that it brings some sense of relief to the victims’ loved ones and to the community, who for the past 47 years have had no answers.” Adams said. Sinopoli is currently in custody and is being held without bail. He was Arrested without incident around 7 am Sunday at his home on the 300 block of Faulkner Drive. DNA evidence led to arrest Biechler’s aunt and uncle found her body on Dec. 5, 1975, in her home at the Spring Manor Apartments in Manor Township. She had been stabbed 19 times in her back, chest and neck. She also had defensive wounds. Adams said, at one time, Sinopoli lived in the same four-unit building, which had a shared lobby, as Biechler. Other than living in the same building for a period of time, Adams did not elaborate on any connection between Sinopoli and Biechler. Sinopoli was identified through DNA genealogy, which uses a DNA sample in combination with family trees, public archives, databases and court records to pinpoint a suspect. Without that, Adams said she is unsure whether he would ever have been identified. “It’s remarkable to think that in 1975, DNA didn’t exist, at least in the criminal court system,” Adams said. But as the technology advanced with companies like Parabon NanoLabs, cold case investigators used it to solve crimes. DNA collected from Biechler’s clothing scene led CeCe Moore, with Parabon, to a suspect with ethnicity from Gasperina, a small town in southern Italy.”These restrictions further narrowed the scope of the subsequent research because there were very few individuals living in Lancaster at that time of the crime that were the right age, gender and had the family tree consistent with these origins,” Moore said. When Sinopoli was identified as a suspect, police followed him to the Philadelphia airport. That’s where he threw away a coffee cup, Investigators said, and DNA from the cup was used to confirm the Parabon tip.”It’s a highly scientific tip, but a tip just the same,” Moore said. technology? Even though I’ve seen it before in previous cases, yes, it amazes me what CeCe Moore and her company can do,” Adams said. Sinopoli faces one charge of criminal homicide.

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Lancaster County District Attorney Heather Adams announced Monday an arrest in the county’s oldest cold case, the 1975 Murder of 19-year-old Lindy Sue Biechler.

At a Monday morning news conference, Adams said police have arrested David Vincent Sinopoli, 68, of East Hempfield Township.

Note: you can watch the full news conference in the video player below.

“Lindy Sue Biechler was 19 when her life was brutally taken away from her 46 years ago in the sanctity of her own home. The arrest of David Sinopoli marks the beginning of the court process and we hope that it brings some sense of relief to the victims’ loved ones and to the community, who for the past 47 years have had no answers.” Adams said.

Sinopoli is currently in custody and is being held without bail. He was arrested without incident around 7 am Sunday at his home on the 300 block of Faulkner Drive.

Lancaster County District Attorney’s Office

Sinopoli is being held at the Lancaster County Prison.

DNA evidence led to arrest

Biechler’s aunt and uncle found her body on Dec. 5, 1975, in her home at the Spring Manor Apartments in Manor Township. She had been stabbed 19 times in her back, chest and neck. She also had defensive wounds.

Adams said, at one time, Sinopoli lived in the same four-unit building, which had a shared lobby, as Biechler.

Other than living in the same building for a period of time, Adams did not elaborate on any connection between Sinopoli and Biechler.

Sinopoli was identified through DNA genealogy, which uses a DNA sample in combination with family trees, public archives, databases and court records to pinpoint a suspect. Without that, Adams said she is unsure whether he would ever have been identified.

“It’s remarkable to think that in 1975, DNA didn’t exist, at least in the criminal court system,” Adams said.

But as the technology advanced with companies like Parabon NanoLabs, cold case investigators used it to solve crimes.

DNA collected from Biechler’s clothing scene led CeCe Moore, with Parabon, to a suspect with ethnicity from Gasperina, a small town in southern Italy.

“These restrictions further narrowed the scope of the subsequent research because there were very few individuals living in Lancaster at that time of the crime that were the right age, gender and had the family tree consistent with these origins,” Moore said.

When Sinopoli was identified as a suspect, the police followed him to the Philadelphia airport. That’s where he threw away a coffee cup, Investigators said, and DNA from the cup was used to confirm the Parabon tip.

“It’s a highly scientific tip, but a tip just the same,” Moore said.

“Am I astounded by the DNA technology? Even though I’ve seen it before in previous cases, yes, it astounds me what CeCe Moore and her company can do,” Adams said.

Sinopoli faces one charge of criminal homicide.

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